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Tuesday, July 24, 2012


Feeding the homeless banned in major cities all over America

Posted by Justin Jeffre

This article describes how many cities are creating bans that prevent people from feeding hungry people that are experiencing homelessness. Sadly here in Cincinnati Food Not Bombs has been harassed for sharing healthy food with those that are hungry.


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  1. Brett says:

    Read ‘When Helping Hurts’ If for nothing else a different perspective.

    I’m not say do not feed the homeless. I have. In fact I support feeding those in need, especially when they have nothing. There are times when relief is warranted and very necessary. However, whether you agree with the book or not (yes its a little churchy sometimes so try and get over that if you don’t follow christian beliefs) alot of the logic in the book will make one think. For what its worth, its an intersting read, and I found the perspective different than my own. Got me thinking.

  2. Sean holbrook says:

    I went out and meet up with some people from “food not bombs” awhile ago. Now I’m not trying to be a jerk but the food these guys were giving out to the homeless was awful. I would have preferred a bomb in my mouth instead of a second serving.
    What they are doing is noble, no person in a country of plenty like ours deserves to go hungry, and it should never be illegal to help feed people with safe clean food.
    But on that given day, the food they were serving was made by, for, and possibly with assholes.
    Im sure I just caught FNB’s on a bad day.
    It’s sad that the powers to be would discourage interaction between those willing to help and the less fortunate. Maybe its easier to control the have-nots by making them dependent on government backed services.

  3. Jean says:

    Mr. Holbrook, I’m sure you’re busy day in and day out working selflessly to help create a better society, but if you ever have some down time, Food Not Bombs invites you to come back and eat with us again. It’s tricky to create culinary masterpieces while limited to what happens to be in surplus at the time, but we strive for our dishes to be both nourishing and tasty. Maybe if you still find us lacking, despite our killer summertime bounty, you can pitch in and help!

    Also, as FNB only shares vegetarian meals, for both food safety and ethical reasons, I can promise that our dishes are not only safe and clean, but 100% asshole free.

    Love,
    a volunteer

    p.s. Thanks to the Beacon for posting this article. Sharing food with the hungry is an unregulated act of kindness. Rescind all laws restricting compassion!

  4. Dave Cook says:

    Sorry you didn’t like our food, Sean.  We serve a lot of vegetable dishes and curries, and rice.  It depends a lot on what we get in food donations that week.  We really like the vegetavles and curries, and have found that most adults do, too.  But the kids aren’t so crazy about them.  I was just telling other Cincy FNBers about the disappointed look I saw on a kid’s face in Washington Park last Sunday, when he tried one of our cucumber and tomato sandwiches on a hamburger bun - he thought he he was getting a real hamburger!

    We’re completely vegetarian.  We don’t share meat for a couple reasons.  Check out the article about us in an upcoming issue of Streetvibes for the reasons why.  We’e been getting most of our food these days from donations from the Northside Farmer’s Market and CAIN - Churches Active in Northside - and that means a lot of vegetables in the summer, especially zucchini and cucumbers.  We also get fruit and bread donations from people who work in the local food industry.

    Last week we started making shaghetti and the kids, and even the adults, really went for it.  Spaghetti is a huge hit, so we’ll keep sharing it along with our veggies with folks at Piatt Park, by the Garfield statue, on Saturdays at 1:00 PM, and in Washington Park, in the bandstand, on Sundays at 5:00 PM.  Please come by and give us another try.  We really want to provide good tasting, nutritionally balanced food to people.  Look for me, Dave, at either event and tell what dish it was that you found so bad.  We want all our friends who eat with us to be happy with the food we share with them!

  5. Sean Holbrook says:

    Jean Im glad you took time to recognize my hours of selfless service to ensure the betterment of humanity.
    I’d also like to thank you for letting me know that your food is sphincter free, a few years back I performed bungalingus on a lady friends back-side and was seriously sick for 72 hours with an awful stomach bug.
    Don’t get me wrong, I respect what you all are doing, and as stated above Im sure I just caught you on a bad day or a dish that didn’t agree with my tastes.
    Dave Cook explains it best when he says, “The kids aren’t so crazy about them.”
    I eat the diet of a child, embody boyish good looks, and am very immature, I was/am probably not mentally old enough to enjoy the food when I tasted it.
    But I am willing to try it again, in fact I am making it a point to seek out your next serving place/time to try the food again.
    I will post my results in the comments of this post, and I will give a full honest review of my experience.
    This way if I end up really enjoying it, I can eat crow in front of an audience,

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